Playing The Piano Makes You Smarter??

photo courtesy freedigitalphotos.net

As each generation comes along, parents are all trying to make decisions for their children that will give them what they missed out on, provide opportunities the parent values and in general, give their child ‘the advantage’ in life.  Our determined parenting values will influence what extracurricular activities our child should be enrolled in for future success.

Some parents will enroll their child in a sport in hopes that their child will become the next ‘great one’.  Some parents will enroll their child in dance so mommy will have a dance partner (hey, that is me).  Some parents will put their child in music lessons because they wished they had that opportunity when they were a child.  Ultimately, we all want what is best for our child. 

In my personal life, I question, when is too early and when is too late to ensure my child will have the desired opportunity and outcome that I dream for them?  Daddy and I have had a few discussions over the years of the opportunities we would like to provide.  We know swimming is non-negotiable; we both would be classified as barely able to stay afloat so we know that we wish we could swim so we know we will ensure that our children will have this opportunity.  As for sports and music, these are both opportunities that we haven’t officially decided on but will be up for future discussion.

I recently read a 2001 article, Playing The Piano Makes You Smarter from  thought-provoking brainconnection.com.  It mentions that children who play the piano beginning at a certain age (it doesn’t say but probably sooner than later) have an improvement in spacial-temporal ability.  According to Wikipedia, this ability is important for generating and conceptualizing solutions to multi-step problems that arise in areas such as architecture, engineering, science, mathematics, art, games, and everyday life.

With my strong desire to help stimulate brain development and provide opportunities; piano may be added to our list for the boys.  Learning music to me is like dancing, it is good for the soul.  If you enjoy music you can enjoy it through dancing or playing, I encourage it for all.  If it helps prepare your brain for other opportunities in life how can I say no?

We have decided that the boys will only have one extracurricular activity at a time in order to establish a balance for them.  I look forward to planning it, seeing what their interests are and helping them to pursue it.  It is exciting to know I am blessed with this opportunity to mould, shape and love these two little boys the way I want to.  Thank you God!

How did you decide which extracurricular activities you would enroll your child/children in?

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4 thoughts on “Playing The Piano Makes You Smarter??

  1. My parents were guilty of living vicariously through me. I was tortured with seven years of piano lessons, hours of practice and loathe the instrument to this day. My husband was also forced to take lessons. His were even worse because his instructor would crack his knuckles with a ruler if he made a mistake.

    Having said that, I did not want to deny my own children opportunities simply because of my feelings about it. When my children asked to take piano lessons (a piano is an expensive instrument), I made a deal with them. Once you start, you must finish the year out. If you don’t wish to continue the following year, you may replace it with some other activity – no questions asked.

    My son took lessons for about 3 years. My daughter until she graduated from high school. She played both piano and organ for the church as well. Funny thing? My son is the professional musician!!!

    Extracurriicular activities should be enjoyable for the children and not just the parents. Use them as a way to allow your children to explore and find their interests and you will not go wrong.

    Thanks for the memories.

  2. We let our children choose their activity, and they would have one at a time. My daughter did take piano lessons for a few years. When my son was 4, his father forced him to join up with T-ball and he hated it! He cried as he ran the bases, the coach holding his hand and running with him! Thereafter, both children took various classses: art, acting, but I never forced it.

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